If you’re not fully away what fire poi is, a quick Google search explains that: “Fire poi use wicks for the weighted ends (often made using Kevlar). The bottom flap of the wick is sewn with Kevlar thread, which ensures the wick has a longer life. The wicks are soaked in fuel, set on fire, and then spun for dramatic effect.”

A time lapse image of fire poi in action near Quality Unearthed

The origins of poi can be traced back to the Māori people of New Zealand, where it is still often practiced today. Poi has also gained a following in many other countries. The popularity of poi and the culture that encompasses it has led to a notable growth in various areas, including the styles practiced, the tools used, and even the definition of the word “poi.”

 

To explain poi – which includes fire too- a little more, it can refer to both the style of performing art as well as the equipment used for performance. Poi is largely based around being a performance art, which involves swinging tethered weights through a variety of rhythmical and geometric patterns that look like a dance routine. There are some poi artists who may sing and/or dance while swinging their poi.

 

There are various materials that poi can be made from, as well as a range of different handles, weights, and effects, such as fire, or, more recently LED.

Traditionally, the Maori poi will be performed as a group choreography and is usually seen at cultural events, which is paired with vocal and musical accompaniment. Compare this to the more modern poi and you will find that it is typically performed by individuals who practice it without singing, using a less choreographed structure to their performance.

 

Take a look at these 5 videos of amazing modern style poi in action:

Poi is a wonderful thing to keep your mind and body fit and healthy, and with the space that is on offer at our luxury camping UK accommodation, you can learn and practice ‘til your hearts content. Why not give it a go?

Videos courtesy of: Mantas Zinkevičius, MArvin Ong, SHANTI, yuta, lepraleprosy /YouTube.

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