If you are going on a family-friendly glamping break this spring or summer, then you’ll no doubt want to do some exploring on foot and quite possibly with a camera. If you know how to find the best things to take pictures of and the best way to capture them result-wise, then you’re more likely to capture their interests and keep them keen.

Two small children sit contentedly among the flowers

Basics, such as demonstrating how to hold the camera still and straight/level, as well as not pressing the shutter too hard come first and are the foundations. Once they’ve got those skills on board then they are probably going to be super excited about getting out and seeing what they can take pictures of! Essentially, these are great memories that can be saved and relived for years to come.

 

Here’s six great ways to take outdoor photos:

 

Find different angles

Look up to see the patterns leaves make against the sky; look down and snap the trees reflected in a pool, or the dappled patterns on the ground made by sunlight filtering through the leaves.

 

Shh! Don’t startle the wildlife

You’re walking along, enjoying the surroundings and tranquillity when you come across an otter at the edge of a river, or a fox soaking up the sun in a field, or a woodpecker going to work on a tree, the last thing you want to do is startle them and lose a photo opportunity. Remind the children that it’s really important to be as quiet as possible, and don’t be too impatient, or they won’t get a good picture.

 

Focus up

If you want to capture the best pictures of the fascinating little creepy crawlies that have made their way on to your children’s hand for example, then by getting close and zooming in will allow them to get the best pictures possible. This can also be used when it comes to nature as well as wildlife.

 

Contrasting colour

If you’re out in the woods, then you’ll soon see that it’s not all about the greens and browns of leaves and trees. Find something that is bursting with some bright colour to add interest to pictures. The list is endless but to give you an idea, they could find a flower coming into bloom or some bright berries (be careful they don’t eat them without checking with you first). Another idea could be to make a rainbow of colours and take a picture of something that is a different colour as and when they find it.

 

Surprise!

This one’s for the grownups. If the children are playing out in the beautiful surroundings, then be sure to take your pictures when they’re not looking. If they’re throwing leaves or inquisitively looking in a lake or stream, grab a shot with the camera. Impulsive, natural photos are more often than not the best ones.

 

Image: Neil Kennedy under Creative Commons Licence.

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