Following on from evidence that bluestones had been quarried in Wales some 500 years prior to being erected in the Wiltshire heritage site there is fresh news that prompts the notion that Stonehenge could be in its secondary ‘home’.

The sun setting on the famous Stonehenge heritage site near Quality Unearthed glamping accommodation

The confirmation of quarrying for Stonehenge’s bluestones features as part of the significant discoveries at the forefront of archaeologists hypothesising over England’s greatest prehistoric monument, and the fact that it could well have initially been established and erected in neighbouring Wales.

Pembrokeshire’s Preseli hills have long been known as the origin of Stonehenge’s inner horseshoe, some 140 miles away from Salisbury Plain.

However, there have been recent revelations relating to archaeologists discovering a series of recesses in the rocky crags of Craig Rhos-y-felin and Carn Goedog, cited to the north of Preseli hills. Those discoveries match Stonehenge’s bluestones in their shape, size, and general consistency. Additionally, experts have also found comparable stones that the prehistoric builders ‘mined’, only to leave them behind.  Furthermore, a “loading bay” from where the huge stones could be dragged away has been identified.

Carbonised hazelnut shells and charcoal from the quarry workers’ campfires have been radiocarbon-dated to reveal when the stones would have been extracted.

Director of the project and professor of British later prehistory at University College London (UCL), Prof Mike Parker Pearson, was quoted as saying the fresh finds were “amazing”, and we’re inclined to support his feelings on this one!

We’ll be keeping a close eye on developments regarding this story. In the meantime, if you want to go glamping, Wales offers some amazing places you can discover, while they might not match up to the Stonehenge news, you never know what you might find!

 

Image: friedwater under Creative Commons.

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