A wonderful competition you may or may not have heard of is currently and needs your help. If you love going on treehouse holidays and enjoy the sight of some of nature’s greatest creations in the form of grand old trees then take a look at these beauties. 
The Major Oak, Nottinghamshire | England's Tree of the Year | Treehouse Holidays

The competition, run by nature charity Woodland Trust, will see their eventual winner of the contest take on the finest specimens from a host of other countries in an international competition in 2015.

The competition originally started out with over 200 nominations has now been trimmed down to a shortlist of just 10 finalists.

The winner will be decided by public vote, and you can place your vote by visiting the Woodland Trust website.

Take a look at the England Tree of the Year finalists here:

Kett’s Oak, Norfolk

Kett's Oak, Norfolk | England's  Tree of the Year | Treehouse Holidays

This healthy finalist is cited next to the B1172 near Hethersett. Historically, the men who marched on Norwich during the Norfolk Rebellion rendezvoused under the tree in 1549.

Ankerwycke Yew, Surrey

Ankerwycke Yew, Surrey | England's  Tree of the Year | Treehouse Holidays

Thought to be more than 1,400 years old, King John signed the Magna Carta in the “meeting meadow” opposite the yew.

Allerton Oak, Merseyside

Allerton Oak, Merseyside | England's  Tree of the Year | Treehouse Holidays

Found in Calderstones Park in Liverpool, this finalist is over 1,000 years old. 

Big Bellied Oak, Wiltshire

Big Belllied Oak, Wiltshire | England's  Tree of the Year | Treehouse Holidays

The Tree Council acknowledged this finalist’s heritage as part of the celebration of the Golden Jubilee in 2002 by naming it in a list of fifty Great British Trees.

Whiteleaved Oak, Herefordshire

Whiteleaved Oak, Herefordshire | England's  Tree of the Year | Treehouse Holidays

Estimated to be around 500 years old, this mighty tree is situated at the southern end of the Malvern Hills. It is continued to be used in druidic ceremonies to this day, additionally it even has its own visitors’ book.

Ickwell Oak, Bedfordshire

Ickwell Oak, Bedfordshire | England's  Tree of the Year | Treehouse Holidays

You can find this finalist in Ickwell, rooted within the boundary of the 175-year-old cricket club. Rather impressively, a branch, which fell off during a storm, was used to make three seats which marked the millennium celebrations.

Newton’s Apple Tree, Lincolnshire

Newton's Apple Tree, Lincolnshire | England's  Tree of the Year | Treehouse Holidays

This is the very tree that is said to have been the source of inspiration for Sir Isaac Newton’s theory of gravity, when an apple dropped on his head as he sat underneath it.

 

Shugborough Yew, Staffordshire

Shugborough Yew, Staffordshire | England's  Tree of the Year | Treehouse Holidays

The yew is understood to be have been around for over 350 years old, with an extraordinary span of 200 yards. The Woodland Trust state that this is thought to be the widest tree in Britain and Ireland, and it is still spreading with no signs of stopping any time soon.

Old Knobbley, Essex

Old Knobbley, Essex | England's  Tree of the Year | Treehouse Holidays

This age old finalist has found that step-like creations have formed in the back of the trunk over years of people enjoying the classic pastime of climbing the tree.

The Major Oak, Nottinghamshire

The Major  Oak, Nottinghamshire | England's  Tree of the Year | Treehouse Holidays

Arguably the most famous of all the trees, found in Sherwood Forest, is the 23 tonne Major Oak. Purportedly where Robin Hood and his merry men would take shelter and sleep.

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